Transition Curricula

Transition Curricula

Annotated Bibliography

Developed for the National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center by La’Shawndra Scroggins

 

In a review of intervention research, the National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC) has identified over 60 evidence-based practices in secondary transition education and services for using published curricula to teach students self-determination skills.   The review has not yet identified evidence-based practices for using curricula to teach other transition-related skills, using the criteria for identifying such practices as described in NSTTAC’s literature review procedures (http://www.nsttac.org/content/literature-review-process).  However, transition specialists, teachers, and administrators are often searching for instructional products that are evidence or research-based.

The purpose of this annotated bibliography is to provide the field with an overview of secondary transition curricular resources. This overview examines the research behind curricula that exists to teach transition skills to students with disabilities and is intended as a starting point for consumers and researchers.  The curricula described are categorized as self-determination, comprehensive transition, or financial literacy.  Self-determination curricula are designed to promote independence through decision-making in any of life’s major domains (e.g., education, employment, independent living).  Comprehensive transition curricula are designed to prepare individuals to be successful in a particular domain (i.e., education, employment, independent living).  Financial literacy curricula have been developed to prepare individuals to manage their money and accounts.  Curricula included in the document are not endorsed by NSTTAC. 

This document is organized in two parts.  The first part is a bibliography that includes (a) the name of the curriculum, (b) the purpose and basic structure of the curricula, (c) materials included, (d), and if the curriculum was determined to be an evidence-based practice.  The second part of the document includes a table listing each curriculum in the annotated bibliography.  The table indicates, with a checkmark, the area of transition the curriculum addresses.  Further the document is organized by the skill(s) taught through use of the curricula. NSTTAC anticipates this will be a living document.  As new research is conducted this, as with all of NSTTAC’s literature resources, will be updated.  If consumers are aware of published research on a curriculum, please communicate the information to NSTTAC through nsttacmail@uncc.edu.

 

Self-Determination Curricula

  1. ChoiceMaker Self-Determination Transition Curriculum Components

ChoiceMaker is a self-determination transition curriculum comprised of five components designed to teach middle and high school students transition skills that will prepare them to be successful while in school and throughout adulthood.  Components of the curriculum may be purchased separately.

 

The Self-Directed IEP

Martin, J. E., Marshall, L. H., Maxson, L. M., & Jerman, P. L. (1996). The Self-Directed IEP. Longmont, CO: Sopris West.

  • Teaches student to be an active participant in their educational planning meetings
  • Consists of 11 sequential lessons and may take six to ten 45 minute lessons to teach.
  • May be taught in a variety of settings including (a) resource, (b) self-contained, or (c) study skills classes.
  • Materials included are (a) video, (b) teachers’ manual, and (c) student workbook
  • Cost: > $100
  • This is an evidence-based practice identified by NSTTAC using the following references:

Allen, S., Smith, A., Test, D. W., Flowers, C., & Wood, W. M. (2001). The effects of Self-Directed IEP on student participation in IEP meetings. Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 24, 107-120.

Martin, J. E., Van Dycke, J. L., Christensen, W. R., Greene, B. A., Gardner, J. E., & Lovett, D. L. (2006). Increasing student participation in their transition IEP meetings: Establishing the Self-Directed IEP as an evidenced-based practice.  Exceptional Children, 72, 299-316.

Snyder, E. P., & Shapiro, E. S. (1997). Teaching students with emotional/behavioral disorders the skills to participate in the development of their own IEPs.  Behavioral Disorders, 22, 246-259.

 

Choosing Employment Goals

Marshall, L. H., Martin, J. E., Maxson, L. L., & Jerman, P. A. (1997). Choosing employment goals. Longmont, CO: Sopris West.

  • Lessons permit students to reflect upon their experiences, draw conclusions about themselves, and learn about community opportunities.  Information gathered over time help students to make informed career choices.
  • Consists of three parts: (a) choosing general goals lessons, (b) experience-based lessons, and (c) dream job lessons.
  • Offers lessons that can be taught out of sequence.  Flexibility allows for infusion of other content.
  • Activities are conducted at community job sites and in the classroom. 
  • Materials included are (a) video, (b) teachers’ manual, and (c) student workbook.
  • Cost: > $100
  • No published literature on curriculum could be found; however, it has been field tested.

 

Choosing Personal Goals

Martin, J. E., Marshall, L. H., L., Hughes, W. M., Jerman, P. A., & Maxson, L. L. (1999). Choosing personal goals. Longmont, CO: Sopris West, Inc.

  • Designed to help students reflect on their experiences, draw conclusions about themselves, and learn about their community opportunities.  Information gathered is to be used to help make career decisions.
  • Students set goals based on jobs of interest.  Once the job is identified, student determines whether or not they know the job’s requirements.  The requirements that they do not know become goals.
  • Instruction takes place in the community and in the classroom. 
  • Materials included are (a) video, (b) teachers’ manual, and (c) student workbook.
  • Cost: $131.49
  • No published literature on curriculum could be found; however, it has been field tested.

 

Choosing Education Goals

Martin, J. E., Marshall, L. H., L., Hughes, W. M., Jerman, P. A., & Maxson, L. L. (2000). Choosing education goals. Longmont, CO: Sopris West, Inc.

  • Teaches students how to (a) identify their interests, skills, and limits; (b) identify educational opportunities; and (c) develop goals based on their interests, skills, and opportunities.
  • Teaches completing a plan of study so that the student may present it at their IEP meeting.
  • Process of selecting goals is taught through video-modeling.
  • Materials included are (a) video, (b) teachers’ manual, and (c) student workbook.
  • Cost: > $100
  • No published literature on curriculum could be found; however, it has been field tested.

 

Take Action

Marshall, L. H., Martin, J. E.,. Maxson, L. M., Miller, T. L., McGill, T., Hughes, W. M., & Jerman, P. A. (1999). Take action: Making goals happen. Longmont, CO: Sopris West.

  • Designed to teach students how to attain their goals through self-regulation.
  • Goal attainment is taught by dividing long-term goals in short-term goals, demonstrating a goal attainment strategy
  • Teaches student to plan how they will achieve their goals by having them decide (a) a standard goal of performance, (b) ways to get feedback on performance, (c) what motivates efforts, (d) strategies for goal attainment, (e) need of support, and (f) a schedule.
  • Lessons are applicable to any goal or project including IEP goals.
  • Materials included are (a) video, (b) teachers’ manual, and (c) student worksheets.
  • Cost: > $100
  • This practice has a potential level of evidence as defined by NSTTAC using the following reference:

German, S.L., Martin, J.E., Marshal, L.H., & Sale, R.P. (2000).  Promoting self-determination: Using Take Action to teach goal attainment.  Career Development for Exceptional Individuals, 23, 27-38.

 

2. Next S.T.E.P.: Student transition and educational planning

Field, S., & Hoffman, A. (1996). Steps to Self-Determination: A curriculum to help adolescents learn to achieve their goals. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

  • Designed to teach youth ages 14-21 to successfully participate in self-directed transition planning.  Participants may or may not have a disability; however, it is not designed for students with severe cognitive disabilities.
  • Teaches students how to (a) define their aspirations, (b) engage in self-evaluation, (c) set goals, and (d) plan activities.  Additionally, it prepares students to lead their transition meetings and achieve their goals.
  • The Next S.T.E.P. curriculum consists of 19 lessons, takes approximately three months to complete, and it is recommended that instruction is provided two times per week.
  • Materials include: (a) instructional manual, (b) student workbook, and (c) video.
  • Costs:
    • Next S.T.E.P. Complete Kit- > $200
    • Instructor’s Manual- < $50
    • Next S.T.E.P. Teachers Talking to Teachers- < $125
    • Student Workbooks (5 copies)- < $50
    • Video- ≥ $100
  • No published literature on curriculum could be found; however, it has been field tested.

 

3. The Self-Advocacy Strategy

VanReusen, A. K., Bos, C., & Schumaker, J. B. (1994) Self-Advocacy Strategy for education and transition planning. Lawrence, KS: Edge Enterprises.

  • A motivation and self-determination strategy designed to prepare students to participate in education or transition planning conferences.
  • Consists of 5 steps which are taught over a series of seven acquisition and generalization stages. The five steps are presented using the mnemonic “I PLAN” to help cue students to remember the steps for the strategy. I PLAN represents:
    • I - Inventory completed by students listing their strengths, weaknesses, learning needs, goals, and choices to prepare them for their upcoming IEP conference
    • P - Provide your inventory involves identifying appropriate time for individual to share information during the conference, speaking clearly and completely, and referring to inventory as needed
    • L - Listen & Respond addresses being an active listener and responding to statements made by others in a positive manner
    • A - Ask questions focuses on asking appropriate questions to gather needed information
    • N - Name your goals to communicate goals and ideas on actions to be taken
  • Instruction is provided in seven stages:
      • Stage 1: Orient and Make Commitments
      • Stage 2: Describe
      • Stage 3: Model and Prepare
      • Stage 4: Verbal Practice
      • Stage 5: Group Practice and Feedback
      • Stage 6: Individual Practice and Feedback
      • Stage 7: Generalization
  • Materials include an instructional manual which contains lesson plans, evaluation guidelines, and instructional materials.
  • The current manual was revised in 2007; a CD-ROM version of the strategy may be purchased
  • Cost of manual: < $50
  • Cost manual and CD: < $50
  • Cost of CD: < $50
  • This is an evidence-based practice identified by NSTTAC using the following references:

Lancaster, P.E.,  Schumaker, J.B., & Deschler, D.D. (2002).  The development and validation of an interactive hypermedia program for teaching a self-advocacy strategy to students with disabilities.  Learning Disability Quarterly, 25, 277-302.

Test, D. W., & Neale, M. (2004). Using the Self-Advocacy Strategy to increase middle graders’ IEP participation. Journal of Behavioral Education, 13, 135-145.

VanReusen, A. K., & Bos, C. (1994). Facilitating student participation in individualized educational programs through motivational strategies and instruction. Exceptional Children, 22, 30-32.

VanReusen, A. K., Deshler, D. D., & Schuamker, J. B. (1989). Effects of a student participation strategy in facilitating the involvement of adolescents with learning disabilities in the individualized educational program planning process. Learning Disabilities, 1, 23-34.

 

4. Steps to Self-Determination: A curriculum to Help Adolescents Learn to Achieve Their Goals

Field, S., & Hoffman, A. (1996). Steps to self-determination: A curriculum to help adolescents learn to achieve their goals. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed, Inc.

  • Designed to help secondary students to define and achieve goals they have identified as important.
  • Major areas of focus of the curriculum include:
    • Progress tracking with the Self-Determination Knowledge Scale pretest/posttest
    • Identifying strengths, weaknesses, needs, and preferences
    • Developing decision-making skills
    • Identifying rights and responsibilities
    • Goal setting
    • Anticipating consequences
    • Enhancing creativity
    • Developing communication skills
    • Accessing resources and support
    • Developing negotiation skills
    • Experiencing and learning from outcomes
  • Includes 16 sessions with lesson plans.
  • Materials include (a) instructor’s guide, (b) CD-ROM with student activities, (c) DVD, (d) student activity book, and (e) self-determination knowledge scale.
  • Costs:
    • Complete program- > $100
    • DVD- > $50
    • Student Activity Book- < $50
  • No published literature on curriculum could be found; however, it has been field tested.

 

5. Whose Future Is It?

Wehmeyer, M.,  Lawrence, M., Garner, N., Soukup, J., & Palmer, S. (2004).  Whose Future is it Anyway?  Beach Center on Disability, KUCDD, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS.

  • Provides a student-directed transition planning process that emphasizes identifying preferences, interests, and needs of students. 
  • Comprised of six sections and 36 lessons, designed to provide students with disabilities the opportunity to become self-aware and develop essential components of self-determination such as decision-making, problem-solving, and goal-setting.
  • Amount of self-directedness varies according to students’ strengths and needs. 
  • Materials may be accessed from the Zarrow Center’s website at http://www.ou.edu/content/dam/Education/documents/wfc-guide-final.pdf and are free.
  • This is an evidence-based practice identified by NSTTAC using the following reference:

Lee, Y., Wehmeyer, M., Palmer, S., Williams, Diehm, K., Davies, D. K., & Stock, S. E. (2011). Effect of student-directed transition planning with a computer-based reading support program on the self-determination of students with disabilities. The Journal of Special Education, 45, 104-117.

 

Comprehensive Transition Curricula

  1. Life Centered Career Education (LCCE)

Life Centered Career Education (2004).  Arlington, VA: The Council for Exceptional Children

  • A comprehensive transition curriculum focusing on the areas of (a) daily living skills, (b) personal-social skills, and (c) occupational skills; academic skills are supported in these areas of the curriculum.
  • Organized into 22 competencies within the three curriculum areas.
  • Materials include (a) a teachers manual, (b) 3 CD-ROMs containing lesson plans and student workbooks, (c) performance battery with administration manual, and (d) knowledge battery with administration manual.
  • Cost:
    • CEC Members- ≥ $800
    • Non-members- ≥ $900
    • No published literature on curriculum could be found; however, it has been field tested.

2. The Transitions Curriculum

The Transitions Curriculum by James Stanfield.

  • Focuses on three competency areas that promote independent living: (a) personal management, (b) career management, and (c) life management.
  • Consists of 300 lessons that include hands-on activities.
  • Materials include (a) 300 lessons, (b) 600 worksheets, (c) scope and sequence charts, (d) connecting activities, (e) core subject index, (f) IEP meeting materials, (g) lesson-by-lesson objectives, and (h) 3 individual volumes.
  • Costs:
    • Volume 1: Personal Management- < $200
    • Volume 2: Career Management- < $200
    • Volume 3: Life Management- < $200
    • All 3 Volumes- < $500
  • No published literature on curriculum could be found; however, it has been field tested.

Financial Literacy Curricula

  1. Family Economics and Financial Education (FEFE)

  • Created by educators for educators designed to raise the personal financial capabilities of young adults.  It is a program of the Take Charge America Institute for Consumer Financial Education and Research at The University of Arizona.
  • Created for students in grades 7 through 12 with and without disabilities.
  • Materials include: (a) ready-to-teach classroom materials, (b) teacher training, (c) newsletters, and (d) grants and other activities.
  • Cost:
    • Free.  An online login is required.  All materials needed are downloadable.
    • If you do not want to download materials, they may be purchased:
      • $1,050: “Take Charge of Your Finances” Curriculum Set: Option 1: Within this package is everything needed to teach the “Take Charge of Your Finances” semester course. This curriculum option contains the “Take Charge” semester course, the “Take Charge” student workbook, the “Life In… United States” simulation set, the “Take Charge Classroom Set of Activity Pieces”, and the “Answer Keys” binder, which contains all the answer keys to the curriculum above.
      • $630: “Take Charge of Your Finances” Curriculum Set: Option 2: This package contains everything needed to teach the “Take Charge” semester course without the simulation. Included within this set are the “Take Charge” semester course, the “Take Charge” student workbook, the “Classroom Set of Activity Pieces”, and the “Answer Keys” binder which contains all the answer keys to the curriculum above.
  • No published literature on curriculum could be found; however, it has been field tested.
  • For more information visit http://fefe.arizona.edu/

2. FDIC’s Money Smart for Young Adults

  • Designed for youth with and without disabilities ages 12-20 years that teaches the basics in personal finances and handling money.
  • In development it was aligned with the educational standards of all 50 states and the District of Columbia, Guam, and the Virgin Islands.
  • Consists of eight instructor-led modules that include a fully scripted guide, participant guide, and overhead slides.  There is a computer-based curriculum (CD-ROM) that allows for realistic exercises that may be ordered.
  • Modules range from 90-110 minutes if taught in its entirety.
  • Offers a customizable curriculum of modules that may be used as a stand-alone.
  • Cost: Free
  • No published literature on curriculum could be found; however, it has been field tested. 

 

  

 

This document was produced under U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs Grant No.  H326J110001.  Marlene Simon-Burroughs served as the project officer.  The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the positions or polices of the Department of Education.  No official endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education of any product, commodity, service or enterprise mentioned in this publication is intended or should be inferred.  This product is public domain.  Authorization to reproduce it in whole or in part is granted.  While permission to reprint this publication is not necessary, the citation should be: National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center (2012). Comprehensive Transition Curricula Annotated Bibliography, Charlotte, NC, NSTTAC.

 

 

Transition Curricula Table

Curriculum

Self-Determination

IEP Participation

Employment Preparation

Social Skills

Independent Living

General Transition Planning

Price

*ChoiceMaker: The Self-Directed IEP

 

 

 

> $100

ChoiceMaker: Choosing Employment Goals

 

 

 

> $100

ChoiceMaker: Choosing Personal Goals

 

 

 

> $100

ChoiceMaker: Choosing Education Goals

 

 

 

> $100

ChoiceMaker: Take Action: Making Goals Happen

 

 

 

 

> $100

*Whose Future is it Anyway?

 

 

 

Free

*The Self-Advocacy Strategy

 

 

 

 

< $100

Next S.T.E.P.: Student Transition and Educational Planning

 

 

 

> $100

Steps to Self-Determination: A curriculum to Help Adolescents Learn to Achieve Their Goals

 

 

 

 

< $100

Life Centered Career Education

 

 

 

> $100

The Transitions Curriculum

 

 

 

> $100

Family Economics and Financial Education

 

 

 

 

 

Free- Online;

> $100  packaged

FDIC’s Money Smart for Young Adults

 

 

 

 

 

Free

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